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Victory’s Lessons

As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic about 25 million students across the country are attending school from home.  Parents and guardians, many of whom are working from home, are juggling parenting, housework, and teaching simultaneously. Victory is in a unique position to fill a need in our community by combining our educational content development skills with our ability to move to a remote-learning environment. Here, you will find lessons written by Victory editors in their specific fields that you can do with children. The lessons are

• engaging and fun for students and adults
• hands-on
• easily completed using household or easily obtained materials
• broken down into short  segments
grade appropriate and aligned to the CCSS and NGSS 
• safe
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At-home lessons: the golden ratio

At-home lessons: the golden ratio

By Michael Avidon, math editor The ancient Greeks thought that the “most aesthetically pleasing” (nicest looking) rectangle was one whose sides conform to the following proportion: We wish to determine the numerical value of the ratio of the sides. More in this series At-home math lessons: Rational and irrational numbers Decimal expansions of rational numbers…

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Introduction to Probability

Introduction to Probability

By Michael Avidon, math editor For Students: Performance Expectations (CCSS) This lesson addresses the following Common Core State Standard (CCSS) for Grade 7: 7.SP.C.5: Understand that the probability of a chance event is a number between 0 and 1 that expresses the likelihood of the event occurring. Larger numbers indicate greater likelihood. A probability near…

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Lesson 1: Decimal Expansions of Rational Numbers

Lesson 1: Decimal Expansions of Rational Numbers

By Michael Avidon, math editor For Students: Performance Expectations (CCSS) This lesson addresses the following Common Core State Standard (CCSS) for Grade 8: 8.NS.A.1: Know that numbers that are not rational are called irrational. Understand informally that every number has a decimal expansion; for rational numbers show that the decimal expansion repeats eventually, and convert…

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Lesson 1: Proportional Relationships

Lesson 1: Proportional Relationships

By Michael Avidon, math editor Tables and Verbal Descriptions: For Students More in this series Lesson 2. Lesson 3. If you want to help your child, use our version for guardians. Performance Expectations (CCSS) This lesson covers the following parts of 7.RP.A.2: Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities. Decide whether two quantities are in…

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What Do Plants Need To Grow?

What Do Plants Need To Grow?

By Morgan Turano, science editor Grades 2 & 3 Science experiment: For students More in this series If you want to help your child, use our version for guardians. Also we provide a Spanish version. Part 1 Introduction What do plants need to grow? Do they need water? Do they need sunlight? How can we…

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Making a Solar Cooker (For Students)

Making a Solar Cooker (For Students)

By Morgan Turano, science editor Part 1 Have you ever opened a car door on a hot summer day? You may have noticed that inside the car was hotter than outside the car. In fact, inside a closed car can get much hotter than it is outside. On a sunny day the inside of a…

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How to prepare for Algebra tests

How to prepare for Algebra tests

By Michael Avidon, math editor A good part of the work we do here is to write and edit items (questions) for high-stakes statewide exams, and one of which is for Algebra. Those items cannot be released to the public, so the items here are not from actual exams, but are written in a similar…

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At-home math lesson: doubling and dividing

At-home math lesson: doubling and dividing

By Michael Avidon, math editor You can calculate the square root of a number to any number of places without a calculator. If the original number is not a perfect square, then its square root will be irrational. Therefore, the decimal expansion is non-terminating and non-repeating. This method will give you the best approximation to…

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Lesson 2: Approximation of Irrational Numbers

Lesson 2: Approximation of Irrational Numbers

By Michael Avidon, math editor For Students: Performance Expectations (CCSS) This lesson addresses the following Common Core State Standard (CCSS) for Grade 8: 8.NS.A.2: Use rational approximations of irrational numbers to compare the size of irrational numbers, locate them approximately on a number line diagram, and estimate the value of expressions (e.g., π2). For example,…

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At-home math lesson: irrationality of the square root of 2

At-home math lesson: irrationality of the square root of 2

By Michael Avidon, math editor How do we know that √2 is irrational? This page provides an indirect proof (also known as a “proof by contradiction”). In general, to give an indirect proof of “Statement A,” you start with the assumption “Statement A is false.” Then you proceed logically until you obtain a contradiction —…

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Lesson 2: Proportional relationships

Lesson 2: Proportional relationships

By Michael Avidon, math editor Equations: For Students More in this series Lesson 1. Lesson 3. If you want to help your child, use our version for guardians.   Performance Expectations (CCSS) This lesson covers the following parts of 7.RP.A.2: Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities. Identify the constant of proportionality (unit rate) in…

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The ‘Roaring Twenties’ changed how Americans lived

The ‘Roaring Twenties’ changed how Americans lived

By Shawn Downes, English Language Arts editor The 1920s are known as the “Roaring Twenties.” The Roaring Twenties began 100 years ago. This decade was an exciting time in America. Many changes happened in the 1920s. People changed where they worked. People changed where they lived. People could buy new things. They could do new…

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What to expect when taking grade 6 high-stakes math exams

What to expect when taking grade 6 high-stakes math exams

By Michael Avidon, math editor A good part of the work we do here is to write and edit items (questions) for high-stakes statewide math exams. Those items cannot be released to the public, so the items here are not from actual exams, but are written in a similar style and align with Common Core…

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At-home math lesson: Approximation of pi

At-home math lesson: Approximation of pi

By Michael Avidon, math editor You have been told that π = 3.14, but have not been shown where this number comes from. Here you will be shown a simple proof that 3 < π < 2√3 = 3.464. A similar, but more complicated, procedure could be used to get a better approximation. More in…

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Lesson 3: Proportional Relationships

Lesson 3: Proportional Relationships

By Michael Avidon, math editor Graphs: For Students   More in this series Lesson 1. Lesson 2. If you want to help your child, use our version for guardians. Spanish version of this lesson. Performance Expectations (CCSS) This lesson covers the following parts of 7.RP.A.2: Recognize and represent proportional relationships between quantities. a. Decide whether…

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How to prepare for Grade 8 state assessment math exams

How to prepare for Grade 8 state assessment math exams

By Michael Avidon, math editor Knowing the format of the questions will help students succeed A good part of the work we do here is writing and editing items (questions) for high-stakes statewide exams. Those items cannot be released to the public, so the items here are not from actual exams, but are written in…

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How to prepare for Grade 7 state assessment math exams

How to prepare for Grade 7 state assessment math exams

By Michael Avidon, math editor Knowing the format of the questions will help students succeed A good part of the work we do here is writing and editing items (questions) for high-stakes statewide exams. Those items cannot be released to the public, so the items here are not from actual exams, but are written in…

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How the flu pandemics compare

How the flu pandemics compare

By Shawn Downes, English Language Arts editor Back in 1918, social distancing helped flatten the curve to allow life to return to normal. On Nov. 11, 1918, World War I officially ended. Many people were celebrating as one of the worst wars the world had ever seen came to a close. However, just as the…

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